Tag Archives: social networking

Transforming Cooperative Extension into a Platform-Ready Knowledge Organization

condo-constructionSitting in on a media interview recently filled me with some new insights into the critical need to render Cooperative Extension not only platform friendly but also platform ready.  And by “ready,” I mean an organization that is not only congenial to platforms but also fully equipped to be early adopters and, in some cases, innovators of open-source platforms.

Indeed, this interview not only filled me with new insights but also with a resolve to drive home this critical truth: Cooperative Extension’s very survival depends on our transforming ourselves into a platform-ready organization.

What Are Platforms?

In human terms, platforms are the outgrowth of open, freewheeling communications environments.  One notable example: the coffeehouses that emerged in 17th century Britain.  These coffeehouses turned out to be fluid environments of information exchange that provided the basis for new ways of thinking and acting.  Over time, they gave rise to a host of open-source platforms, conceptual foundations on which far-reaching intellectual, scientific and technological innovations were built over the course of years, decades, even centuries. The effects of these platforms are still felt today, r

William Hogarth's painting of a spirited 18th century political dinner at a restaurant tavern.

William Hogarth’s painting of a spirited 17th century political dinner at a restaurant tavern.

oughly 500 years later.

Needless to say, the increasing levels of social networking that have followed the advent of Web 2.0 have significantly enhanced the conditions out of which these platforms emerge.

The Interview

The interview that prompted these new insights into platforms involved a reporter from a major Alabama news outlet and Dr. John Fulton, a highly respected Alabama Extension specialist and Auburn University and precision farming pioneer, who discussed the implications of data-management to farming — not only how it will affect farmers but also how it will transform the work of Cooperative Extension educators.

Precision Farming Tractor

Land-grant educators exploring a fully equipped precision-farming tractor

Fulton contends that 2012 will be remembered as the watershed year of farm data management — the year when companies began investing significantly into improving their product and service offerings by providing farmers with ways to aggregate and curate the reams of data generated by farm-related technologies, particularly those associated with precision technology.

To put it another way, the immense amounts of data generated by all these farming technologies have reached a critical mass. In fact, farmers don’t know quite how to assimilate all this data — little wonder why a growing number of entrepreneurs have not only begun noticing this trend  but are also formulating ways to aggregate and curate it on their behalf.  The impression I get is that it has the makings of an entrepreneurial free-for-all, sort of like the mad dash for land and wealth that followed the European settlement of the Americas, Australia and parts of sub-Saharan Africa.

The Makings of an Open-Source Platform

At some point during the interview the realization struck me: This critical mass of farming data constitutes a platform, the basis on which a growing number of entrepreneurs hope to conceive and develop profitable innovations and technologies.

A Lesson for Cooperative Extension

The exchange prompted few random thoughts about the implications of platforms to the future of Cooperative Extension.

First, the data-management issue in farming is a prime example of emergence, basically how a handful of unintentional interactions eventually contribute to great leaps in thinking, which, in the course of leading to new ways of looking at things, provide the basis for new ideas and concepts and, in a few cases, to full-blown innovation.  These new insights sometimes form the basis for highly generative platforms, much as coffeehouses did in the 17th century.

Second, this farm-data trend has been playing out for years.  Yet, even many of the best and brightest in Cooperative Extension, including Fulton, scarcely noticed it until now. Consequently, this development, entirely unforeseen, has presented Cooperative Extension with some real challenges.  If everyone and his brother are trying to build off this platform — to aggregate and curate this data for the benefit of farmers — where does this leave Extension?   What will happen to us as other players manage to capitalize on this platform and others that follow, becoming better equipped along the way to aggregate and curate this data on behalf of farmers?

Third, do our current 20th century linear programming models blind us to change?  Are they preventing us from seeing platforms that are emerging all around us? I think a strong case could be made that they do. These obsoleting programming models —obsoleting is probably a too generous word in this context — are hampering our ability to adapt to the demands of this highly generative information landscape emerging around us.

These points prompt a series of questions, some rather thought-provoking:

  • Could professional training enable us to recognize a platform when we see one?
  •   Is it possible to equip Extension educators with the skills to perceive platforms in the making?
  • Through heightened awareness, is it possible not only to recognize these emerging platforms but also to capitalize on them before they develop into full-fledged platforms?
  • For that matter, is it possible to recognize the environments in which these platforms are likely to emerge so that we can build platforms ahead of everyone else?

Some Parting Thoughts

I suspect that an ability recognize and emerging platforms when you see one is s skill, arguable a critical 21st century job skill, which can be cultivated as readily as other job skills. For the sake of our survival, I think it is incumbent on Extension educators to cultivate an ability to recognize emerging platforms.

This begs the question: If the ability to identify emergent platforms represents a critical new job skill, what kind of professional training would enable Extension professionals to readily acquire these skills? For that matter, how could Extension’s work environment be reconfigured to foster these skills?

One thing of which I’m reasonably certain: We need to formulate ways to incentivize platforms-based thinking — for starters, to reward people who develop the capacity to know an emergent platform when they see one. And remember: This is not something that we can opt to do but that we must do for the sake of our survival.

We must also focus on the specific ways that linear programming models hamper us not only from seeing but also from fully capitalizing on the emerging platforms around us. Likewise, we should identify the most optimal ways to instill our employees with an understanding the nuts and bolts of platforms, not only how these provide the basis for all manner of innovation but also how many of these innovations may ultimately form the basis for even newer, more generative platforms.

What are some of the things that can be undertaken immediately to render Extension not only more platform-ready but also more platform-friendly?

Aside from extensive retraining within our ranks, I think we also should explore ways to create more innovative physical space — in other words, transform Extension working environments to more closely resemble the open, free-wheeling environments that drive innovation.

All of us must also understand how potentially disruptive all of this will be and how it will affect our day-to-day work.  While some of us this sort of talk unsettling, we shouldn’t be surprised by it at all. Platforms not only provide the basis for far-reaching innovations but, in some cases, sweeping transformations, a few of which many threaten many, if not all, facets of our work.

Granted, it’s a bitter pill for many of us, but like it or not, that is the new reality of the 21st century.

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The Two Critical Concepts of the 21st Century: Generative Capacity and Collaboration

Cambridge University mathematician Tim Gowers’s Polymath Project has inspired calls for a more open, collaborative scientific model.

Okay, pardon this passionate outburst but I want to reaffirm something — something I’ve banged on about ad nauseam for the past couple of years: the absolutely indispensable influences generative capacity and collaboration will play in our future.

An article I devoured earlier this morning confirms why these two concepts will likely provide the standard on which public and private entities alike will rise and fall within the 21st century knowledge economy.

Oh, and pardon the unwieldy term “generative capacity.” I simply can’t come up with anything that better describes what will likely be one of the two principal preoccupations for the foreseeable future. I owe Steven Johnson for this term.

Simply put, the massive sharing and social collaboration that has accompanied networking has enabled all forms of thinking, formal and informal alike, to be generated at vastly accelerated volumes.

Much like the 15th century Gutenberg Press, networking is changing all facets of how we develop and share knowledge.  Even science, the principal source of refined, formal knowledge, is proving to be no exception.

A couple of years ago, Cambridge University Tim Gowers engineered a remarkable demonstration of the significance of generative capacity to scientific inquiry when he used his personal blog to solicit the help of people around the world in solving a highly complicated mathematical problem.

His effort, cleverly dubbed the Polymath Project, proceeded on the relatively straightforward premise that online tools can be used to enlist disparate brains into a temporary but greatly enhanced cognitive intelligence.

Within weeks Gowers’s problem was solved as mathematicians from sundry perspectives and with varying levels of expertise weighed in with insights.

Granted, not all of Gowers’s collaborative efforts have met with similar success, but his efforts have been successful enough to lead a number of observers to conclude that this networked approach to problem solving represents the future of science.

As the title of an Oct. 29 Wall Street Journal article aptly observed, “The new Einsteins Will Be Scientists Who Share” — or, in other words, collaborate.

In fact, that rather clever title underscores how these two factors, generative capacity and collaboration, will be inextricably linked in the future.   Borrowing the lyrics from that beloved Sinatra classic, “Love and Marriage,” what unfolds over the next few decades will only underscore that “you can’t have one without the other.”

Collaboration is the critical guarantee of generativeness (again, excuse my digression from standard English).  They work hand in hand.  Optimal generative capacity can only be ensured within open, fluid networks, which are secured only through optimal levels of collaboration.  One of the principal preoccupation of all knowledge providers in the future will be building fluid learning environments — platforms as I prefer to call them — that strive to secure the highest levels of collaboration and generative capacity.

For what it’s worth, I’m personally convinced that science will prove no exception.   Yes, there is resistance.  Proprietorship has been a defining characteristic of science for the last three centuries.  It will take years to divest scientists of the increasingly antiquated notion that writing for professionally refereed journal articles is more valuable to the future of human progress than open sharing of knowledge within extended networks.

Even so, the advent of a new, open and networked scientific model that ensures the fullest measure of generative capacity by securing optimal levels of collaboration is inevitable. As the WSJ article stresses, the immense potential of “discoveries not yet dreamt of” is simply too valuable to ignore.

Generative capacity lies at the heart of this immense potential, and as growing number of scientists will learn, it will only be secured through maximum levels of collaboration.

Tamara and Sam: Portraits of 21st Century Extension Educators

What will an engaged, networked Extension educator look like within the next decade?  Equally important, how will he or she set the benchmark for social media use in the future?

For purposes of illustration and in the interests of advancing the boundaries of imagination, I will employ a time-honored technique: storytelling — only in this case, the characters are entirely fictitious.

Tamara, the Creative Oddball

I’ll start with my main character, a young Extension educator named Tamara.

Tamara is one of those creative oddballs who enlighten us every bit as much as they mystify us.

Teachers recognized something special about Tamara at an early age — a precocious, creative brilliance that she eagerly, if not manically at times, poured into her art classes and school plays.

Ironically, though, these sparks of brilliance didn’t carry over to her school work.  Teachers noted an inability to focus on classroom work.  Her grades suffered. For a time, the teachers even considered testing  her for ADHD.

Tamara Finds Her “Element”

All of this changed in 7th grade when Tamara was exposed to hands-on horticulture for the first time through a plant science project suggested by Rick, an Extension horticulture agent temporarily on loan to 4-H. Rick saw a part of himself in Tamara. He had dealt with a similar struggle balancing his creative passions with the need to slog through standard classroom work.

As Rick had hoped, the plant science project sparked a change in Tamara’s life.  It not only sparked a change: It took hold of Tamara, becoming an all-consuming passion. Much to her teachers’ and parents’ delight, this passion spilled over into all areas of her life.

While she didn’t know it at the time, Tamara had encountered what world renowned educational expert Ken Robinson describes as “the element,” which forms when personal passion and talent are fused.  For Tamara, hours spent with plants seemed like the passage of mere minutes.

This exposure began to open doors for Tamara.  The insights she garnered from working with plants carried over into conventional classroom work, notably biology and chemistry.

By her senior year in high school, her vastly improved grades, coupled with her SAT scores, enabled her to secure a full scholarship to study horticulture at her state land-grant university.

Following college and graduate school, Tamara was offered several lucrative jobs in the nursery/greenhouse industry. She turned all of them down with scarcely a second thought.  Money was never an issue with her.  Rick’s selfless, idealistic professionalism and his all-consuming passion for and connection with plants, had left an indelible impression on her.  For that matter, so had the circle of equally dedicated, idealistic Master Gardeners with whom Rick worked.  She cherished all the times she had spent with them, puttering around greenhouses, transferring plants to local gardens and sharing the almost mystical contentment that comes from watching them grow.

She wanted to be an Extension educator like Rick.

Much to her delight, Tamara eventually landed her dream job as a regional Extension agent specializing in home gardening and pests in a medium-sized metropolitan area. A big part of her job would involve working with Master Gardeners to organize local beautification and educational projects on behalf of adults and youth.

Professionally speaking, Tamara had arrived.

Tamara, the Trendsetter

Even so, like many 23-year-old professionals bearing freshly printed graduate diplomas, she thought she had mastered everything required to excel in her work.  She was also determined to set an organizational benchmark every bit as memorable as that of her mentor, Rick.

After reading about the implications of social media, she became passionately convinced that adopting social media technologies was critical to the future of Cooperative Extension work.

She intended to lead by example.  Soon after taking the reins of her new job, Tamara developed a gardening blog that covered all aspects of her field — one, she hoped, would develop into a definitive source for gardening information in her region.  She links the blog to her Flickr account, which she uses to collect images of new varieties, planted diseases, and invasive species — anything of potential interest to her clients.

She also uses a social bookmarking web service, which has enabled her to compile a staggering resource list encompassing links to trade journal articles and online books.

In addition to operating a Facebook page with other local horticultural Extension agents, Tamara also has developed a hefty Twitter following.  She tweets throughout the day, passing along observations about emerging home gardening issues, responding to client concerns, and questions and sharing links to timely articles.

With the zeal comparable to a 19th century Methodist circuit rider, Tamara started out with every intention of becoming the vanguard of the engaged, networked, 21st century Extension educator.  She was determined to disabuse her fellow educators and clients of all those outmoded, 20th century notions about knowledge dissemination.

She believes that networked Extension educators will have a unique and valuable role serving as aggregators, using social media tools to assemble critical resources on behalf of their clients, and as curators, providing this material within enriched, value-added contexts.

Sam, the Benign Antagonist

Tamara’s zealotry was tempered a bit after a few weeks of association with the benign antagonist of this story:  Sam, age 52, an area crops specialist whose office is located next to Tamara.  Ironically, Sam, the son of a long-serving and beloved county Extension agent, had charted a considerably different career path at Tamara’s age.

Majoring in agronomy at Tamara’s alma mater in the mid-1970s, Sam had undertaken a lucrative career in the agricultural industry following graduation, though always with the hope of retiring early so that he could pursue his real passion: working with farmers as an Extension educator, just as his father had.

He succeeded beyond his wildest dreams.  Five years after ascending the corporate ladder and becoming a regional vice president of a national farm supply company, Sam resigned at 37 to undertake the biggest gamble of his life: to invest all of his life savings into starting his own farm supply company.

The gamble paid off:  less than a decade later, he sold it for a small fortune, though large enough to enable him to live off it comfortably while preparing for his long-awaited second career as an Extension educator.

After enrolling in graduate school at age 45 and securing a master’s degree in agronomy, Sam finally closed the circle, securing a job as a regional agronomy agent and following in his father’s footsteps.  He was assigned an office in a regional Extension center that ultimately would be located next to Tamara’s.

“Brainiac” Meets “Pop”

Weeks after her arrival, Tamara formed a tight professional bond with Sam.  They ultimately became known among their colleagues as the “odd couple.”

He called her “Brainiac.” She called him “Pop.”

From the start, Sam took a deep paternal interest in Tamara.  He admired her earnestness and idealism, especially her willingness to forgo material comforts to pursue her passion — something he simply could not bring himself to do as at the same age.

For her part, Tamara, something of a shy, introverted intellectual, admired Sam for his people skills — those traits that comprise what is widely known today as emotional intelligence.

Tamara marveled at the ease with which Sam connected with new clients, stakeholders and partners at a deep personal level.  Her exposure to Sam opened up new insights into Extension work that she had never previously considered.

Sam helped underscore to Tamara that Extension work is as much about forming a bond with clients —understanding and even empathizing with them — as it is about delivering a product.

As Sam is so fond stressing, half the challenge of Extension work is “getting into his growers’ heads.” By that he means that through years of building close, empathetic relationships with clients, Extension educators can develop a kind of sixth sense, learning how to anticipate their clients’ needs even before they are able to articulate them.

As he’s stressed to Tamara time and again, the most outstanding Extension educators sooner or later cultivate this sixth sense.

Thanks to Sam’s influence, what she initially undervalued — field days, conferences and workshops — she now prizes as valuable ways to connect with her clients and to articulate their needs.

She’s also learned how this intimate person-to-person interaction can enhance her social media outreach work.  Thanks to Sam, she now better understands how the real-life insights she garners through face-to-face contacts can help her refine the sorts of information she shares with her wider audiences through social media channels.

Conversely, she is beginning to appreciate how the global perspective gained through dialogue with her social media contacts will enable her to provide her local clients with a wider, multidisciplinary perspective.

Sam has provided Tamara with something equally valuable: a genuine reverence for the constellation of values that define Cooperative Extension work — as he sees them, values just as relevant to the 21st century as they were a century ago.  He has helped her understand that her success as a networked Extension educator will be measured by how well these traditional values are balanced with the demands of the wired world.

A Two-Way Friendship

Yet, this is far from a one-way relationship: Sam had acquired a few lessons of his own through association with his young friend.

Early in their friendship, Sam had struggled to suppress a chuckle or two when Tamara embarked on one of her passionate jeremiads about why Extension was doomed unless it got serious about social media adoption.

He initially had not only tended to dismiss social media but also feared that it would dilute the intimacy between educator and client that has always underscored Extension work.

However, that didn’t stop Sam from closely observing Tamara’s approach.  Over time, he has even cultivated his own appreciation for the role social media technologies could play in enhancing his own outreach efforts.

While not as far-reaching as Tamara’s, Sam’s efforts are impressive, certainly for a middle-aged man in the middle of a second career.

He has developed his own agronomy weblog that updates area growers about all facets of farming from an agronomic perspective.  Much to his surprise and considerable satisfaction, his stereotypically homespun, self-deprecating writing style has garnered a wide following among row-crop producers throughout the Southeast.  More than once, his pieces dealing with crop projections and the challenge of balancing sustainability with farm profitability have even been carried by major farm-trade publications.

Like Tamara, Sam has also developed an appreciation for the role aggregation and curation increasingly will play in the future of Extension work — an appreciation not only reflected in his weblog but also in the social bookmarking he’s adopted to complement his blog.

In their own unique ways, Tamara and Sam are setting professional benchmarks for other Extension professionals.

Despite their vastly different temperaments, ages and life experiences, they comprise the vanguard of a new type of Extension professional: the engaged, networked Extension educator of the 21st century.

What Museums Can Teach Us

I’ve just now stumbled upon the marvelous New York Times article about how art museums around the country are using social media to develop vastly expanded followings.

Gone are the days when Websites were used only to advertise the institutions’ operating hours, admission prices and exhibitions.

As the article stresses, museum outreach boils down to one word: engagement.  Museums are using emerging technology to enlist the public as active participants.

Viewers now have more online opportunities to watch exhibits under construction, such as a 28-foot tepee at the Brooklyn Museum.  Audiences are also provided with more opportunities than ever to offer input about what museums can do to serve them more effectively.

“It’s less about technology and more about what the visitor can bring to the equation,” says Shelley Bernstein, the Brooklyn Museum’s highly passionate and motivated chief technology officer.

As writer Carol Vogel observes,

While museums have long strived to be welcoming places as well as havens of learning, social media is turning them into virtual community centers.  On Facebook or Twitter or almost any museum Web site, everyone has a voice, and a vote. Curators and online visitors can communicate, learning from one another.

As visitors bring their hand-held devices to visits, the potential for interactivity only intensifies.

Indeed, as Bernstein and others are learning, social media afford curators and visitors enormous opportunities for visiting with and learning from each other.

One point raised in the article especially resounded with me: The determination among the most successfully engaged museum to leave no social media stone unturned.

The developers of these technologies say there is no such thing as too much information. When the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art took its famed Matisse painting “Woman With a Hat” off the wall and into a conservation studio, an image of the frame being removed was posted on FaceBook.  “Suddenly people could have a peak behind the scenes,” said Ian Padgham, the museum’s digital engagement associate. “It’s all about off-the-cuff transparency.”

That’s an important point that can’t be overemphasized: Social media offer almost limitless opportunities for experimentation and creativity.

Imagine for a moment the excitement we Extension educators could  generate by employing similar creative engagement strategies.  One example that quickly comes to mind: county Extension Facebook sites featuring pictures of Master Gardeners busily engaged in spring garden planting.  Why not augment this with opportunities for local growers to offer planting suggestions or to submit pictures and videos of their own production efforts?

Row-crop agents could post regulator youtube or Flickr updates of ongoing producer efforts to deal with weed resistance or provide producers with  opportunities to share their stories.

4-H-related sites could provide space to guest science bloggers and opportunities for youngsters to submit pictures and videos of projects.

For that matter, planning for a spring diabetes meeting or next summer’s crops tours could be crowdsourced, providing clients with greatly enhanced opportunities for input.

Engagement could take a virtually infinite variety of forms.

Whatever the case, the important point to bear in mind is that we Extension educators have a lot to learn from others, especially those cash-strapped public entities that are using social media in ways to engage larger, more diverse audiences.

Towards a Fully Engaged Cooperative Extension Model

Rockwell's County agent

Normal Rockwell's Famed Portrait of an Extension agent at work.

Imagine that you’ve been diagnosed with a life-threatening disease and that saving your life will involve adopting a series of far-reaching lifestyle changes.

Would you adopt these changes?  Considering that your survival is at stake, yes, you probably would.

Cooperative Extension faces a disturbingly similar set of circumstances.  Yes, we’ve faced many challenges over the past 100 years, though nothing like we face today.

A Radically Altered Knowledge Landscape

A few decades ago, we were the dominant feature on the knowledge landscape.  But as the 21st century progresses, our once advantageous command of this landscape has steadily eroded.  The old information order in which people looked to face-to-face encounters and to traditional media, such as printed publications and mass media  as the primary sources of knowledge has been almost entirely supplanted by virtual sources of knowledge— search engines, online communities and other emerging technologies —  that can be accessed literally at the speed of light.

According to New York Times columnist and bestselling author Thomas Friedman, we now operate in a flat world, a informational level playing field in which knowledge providers, no matter their location, are able to compete equally with other knowledge providers across the planet. 

For Extension educators, one of the immediate effects of this new flat world is the steady loss of the competitive advantage we took for granted throughout the 20th century.   Consequently, we face the real risk of organizational decline and possibly even extinction unless we learn how to compete within this crowded — and flattened —knowledge landscape.

The Engaged Extension Educator

The challenges call for nothing less than an organizational transformation — a transformation of Extension professionals into fully engaged educators who not only disseminate knowledge but also build collaborative relationships among people who share common interests.

The new approach will be characterized by both a high degree of collaboration and reciprocity — one in which the client becomes an active collaborator in the production of our knowledge products.  By including our clients as active collaborators, we develop valuable social capital, which, in turn, will enable us to further enhance the value of our products while also allowing us to reach out to even newer audiences.

Yes, traditional Extension methods — field days, conferences, workshops, newsletters and broadcast programs — will remain vital to our mission.  But despite our long and successful use of these methods, they alone will not be enough to help us survive within this radically altered landscape.  

To put it another way, these methods are no long sufficient enough to accommodate our audience’s growing demand for knowledge.

The Value of Social Media

Social media — Facebook and Twitter, to name the two most obvious forms of this technology —will enable us to expand our outreach efforts and audiences in dramatic ways. 

These new social media approaches will enable us to expand our outreach efforts far beyond our traditional role of teacher.  In a manner of speaking, we will use these new technologies to expand our organizational portfolio, thereby enhancing our competitive advantage over other knowledge providers.

We will use these new tools to leverage our abilities, functioning as part teacher, part explainer, part problem solver and, to an increasing degree, as a catalyst whose daily observations not only spark discussion but prompt a growing number of our clients to solve problems on their own.

We would be remiss if we failed to take note of how so many Extension educators are already availing themselves of these new approaches in a myriad of ways.  Horticulture educators who work closely with Master Gardeners employ blogs to update their clients on horticulture-related news and other issues between monthly Master Gardener meetings, workshops and field days.  Likewise, they use social networking tools such as Twitter to supply their clients with daily observations about home gardening, to respond to client questions, to share links to timely online articles, and to connect with others who share these interests.

Among some educators, applications such as Flickr and youtube, often in conjunction with blogs, Facebook and Twitter, are used to alert clients to emerging plant varieties or to potentially threatening diseases.

Blending the Old and the New

In the midst of these changes, we must not lose sight of our traditional roles methods, which, used in conjunction with emerging social media techniques, will distinguish us from other knowledge providers.

We should understand that traditional methods will simply be enhanced and strengthened, not supplanted, by these new technologies.  In fact, our success as 21st century Extension educators will be measured by how effectively we balance traditional organizational values and methods with the new demands of flat world.

For example, we must continue to build collaborative educational partnerships with other public and private entities to enhance the effect of programs and to reach new audiences.

Research-based knowledge must also remain an integral part of our outreach efforts.  This is an asset that historically has enabled us to distinguish our knowledge products from others.  We must never lose sight of how this kind of refined knowledge enables people to make lasting, meaningful changes in their lives. 

The applied research that formed the bedrock of the Extension outreach in the 20th century will be just as indispensible in the 21st.

Deep Context, Part II

Andrew Sullivan rocks the blogosphere.  He has for a long time.

Employing a saying once attributed to Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest, he dominates because he got there “the fastest with the mostest” when this medium was still in its comparative infancy.

Yes, like most innovators, he saw the value of blogging long before many others did.  And like every other successful Web pioneer, he’s not resting on his laurels.  He continues to think out of the box, complementing his erudite but readable prose with interesting, often hilarious, youtube videos, along with carefully chosen photos, color graphs, and other visual media.  He uses these elements not only to illustrate but to underscore his editorial themes.

More recently, he has virtually cornered coverage of the uprising in Iran, underscoring to me, a rather prosaic learner, that blogs really do have the potential of outrunning white elephants — I mean, uh, mainstream media —a remarkable feat when one considers he is only one blogger competing against hundreds of conventional news outlets around throughout the world.

But aside from all the innovative ways he’s enhanced his presence in the last few years, he’s does another thing exceptionally well: He provides his audiences throughout the world with deep context — in many cases, with definitive context.

Any one of his legions of faithful followers who spends at least a half hour on his site leaves with a reasonable degree of assurance that he/she has been well apprised of the issues of the day — the reason why Sullivan’s blog, “The Daily Dish,” is so aptly named.

He also engages his readers.  Not content to concentrate on a couple of topics a day, he roams all over the map, weighing into one issue with a brief paragraph or two, before moving onto something new and often unanticipated.

But just when you think he’s burned out on an issue, he comes bounding back, sometimes with an extended post, sometimes with a terse reply to a reader comment.

You never know what to expect next, and that accounts in large measure for why the Daily Dish remains the 800-pound gorilla of blogging.

And, yes, as you may have already ascertained, I believe Sullivan’s has a lot to teach all of us in Cooperative Extension.

Surf onto any Cooperative Extension Web site, including, I regret to say, ours, and what you almost invariably find are static blogs — an approach that flies in the face of everything that Web 2.0 is teaching us.

We must borrow a page from Andrew Sullivan’s playbook and begin thinking out of the box, packaging blogs that provide all of the things associated with successful blogging: deep context, engagement and, yes, even the occasional unexpected.